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Tired Of The Afternoon Crash?

THINKNOO EXPERT

05 August 2018

With 75% of the world’s coffee going straight into the hands of Americans, we are intimately familiar with the kick of coffee. You’re firing on all cylinders, powering through the day and just when you’re nearly done with your latest task you feel that edge begin to fade – it’s the dreaded afternoon crash!

 

So, what’s going on and do we have to put up with it?

 

Before diving in, we recommend you read our post that explains how coffee works. Put simply, as the day goes on your body releases a sleep-inducing chemical, called adenosine, that eventually puts you to sleep. To counter this, the caffeine in your coffee helps keep this sleep-inducing chemical at bay. As your body processes the caffeine, adenosine rushes in, signals the brain to slow down and, just like that, you’re ready for bed!

 

As you read this, I can hear you thinking “why not just have another coffee?”. 

 

That’s what most of us do and, while it will help, it’s also a double-edged sword. The longer caffeine keeps adenosine from doing its job, the more the body tries to compensate, making you more sensitive to the chemical. This time when the caffeine wears off you’ll feel even more tired than before, especially when you repeat the cycle day-after-day.

 

To remain effective for longer we need to keep adenosine occupied, which is where Theacrine comes in. Theacrine is similar in many ways to caffeine. The important part when it comes to the afternoon crash is that Theacrine will hang around longer than caffeine. And like caffeine, it will displace adenosine effectively allowing you to work for longer. On top of this, preliminary research indicates that tolerance builds slower compared to caffeine, slowing down that sensitivity to adenosine. By taking Theacrine with your coffee you allow it to work with caffeine throughout the day and when caffeine is out for the count Theacrine can continue with the heavy lifting.

 

Now you know, there’s more to the afternoon crash than just feeling tired. Take this knowledge and do something about it!

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Scientific Citations

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